Maine

Portland

Congress Street
#389

Portland City Hall Tower Clock

Clockmaker: Edward Howard & Co.
Installed: about 1919
Owner: City of Portland
Status: Running
Comments: When City Hall was dedicated in august of 1912, its 200-foot clock tower was still under construction. The clock was installed a few years later. Though regularly maintained, the timepiece is endangered because the tower itself is deteriorating and in urgent need of repair.
 
Source: Landmarks Observer, Greater Portland Landmarks Inc, Winter 2005, Volume 30, No.4

portlandlandmarks.org


Portland

Congress Street
#425

Clockmaker: Simon Willard
Installed: 1802 in original church; reinstalled in new church in 1826.
Owner: First Parish Unitarian Universalist Church
Status: Running
Comments: This is an internationally significant timepiece, according to Rick Balzer of Balzer Family Clock Works, which maintains it. It is the only Simon Willard time-and-strike clock still operating in a tower. the inventor of the banjo clock, Willard was the clockmaker to Thomas Jefferson. The church has an 1802 letter in which Willard tells his wife that he is almost finished with the First Parish clock. The clock had been electrified and its strike function disabled when Balzer first serviced it in the 1980s. He found the original parts in the dirt basement. Telling church officers "you've got a Mona Lisa," he put the parts in a crate and chained them to a post for safekeeping. The church hired Balzer to restore the mechanism in 1993.
 
Source: Landmarks Observer, Greater Portland Landmarks Inc, Winter 2005, Volume 30, No.4

portlandlandmarks.org


Portland

Congress Street
#749

Clockmaker: Seth Thomas Clock Co.
Installed: 1925
Owner: Service Corp. International, Houston, Texas
Status: Not Running
Comments: This rare clock has been electrified, but its original parts including the pendulum, are stored in its iron post. The faces and post, which has an ornate globe with dog's heads, show wear. The Hay and Peabody property is for sale, and the owner originally intended to auction the clock separately on eBay. However it is protected by Portland's historic preservation ordinance, and the owners have informed the city that they do not plan to appeal, so the clock will stay put. Seth Thomas Clock Company was one of the most prolific and long-lived clock companies.
 
Source: Landmarks Observer, Greater Portland Landmarks Inc, Winter 2005, Volume 30, No.4

portlandlandmarks.org

Photo: Tom Bernardin


Portland

Commercial street
#100

Clockmaker: Electric Time
Installed: 1990s
Owner: Soley Warf LLC
Status: Running
Comments: The timepiece itself is not historic, but the 1860 Thomas Block has always had a clock in its pediment. In fact, its named for Elias Thomas, who donated its first timepiece.
 
Source: Landmarks Observer, Greater Portland Landmarks Inc, Winter 2005, Volume 30, No.4

portlandlandmarks.org

Photo: Tom Bernardin


Portland

Congress Street
#248

Clockmaker: Edward Howard & Co.
Installed: 1867
Owner: Preservation Management of South Portland
Status: Running
Comments: When the North School was converted to apartments, the clock was dismantled and removed from the site. After learning of the clock's historical significance from Rick Balzer, then-building manager Helen McGinnis tracked it down at a Biddeford apartment complex. She and Balzer loaded the parts into Balzer's station wagon and brought it back to Portland for restoration.
 
Source: Landmarks Observer, Greater Portland Landmarks Inc, Winter 2005, Volume 30, No.4

portlandlandmarks.org

Photo: Tom Bernardin


Portland

Congress Street
#594

Clock by Synchron in the 1980s
Electric movement
Not running

Photo: Tom Bernardin


Portland

Congress Street
#600

Clockmaker: Seth Thomas Clock Co.
Installed: 1920
Owner: Geoffrey Rice of Portland
Status: Not Running
Comments: The clock is not being wound. Its condition is not known.
 
Source: Landmarks Observer, Greater Portland Landmarks Inc, Winter 2005, Volume 30, No.4

portlandlandmarks.org

Photo: Tom Bernardin


Portland

Congress Square
Union Station Tower Clock

Clockmaker: Edward Howard & Co.
Installed: 1888 at Union Station; removed in 1961. Reinstalled at Congress Square in 1982.
Owner: City of Portland
Status: Running
Comments: The Clockwork was rescued from the wrecking ball that took down Union Station by the late Walter Brown, a Maine Central Railroad employee and clock enthusiast. MCR later gave the clock to the City of Portland. It is housed in a small building whose large glass windows double as contemporary dials. the 14-foot pendulum extends into a below-ground well. Hands from each of the original four faces are in private collections.
 
Source: Landmarks Observer, Greater Portland Landmarks Inc, Winter 2005, Volume 30, No.4

portlandlandmarks.org

Photo: Tom Bernardin


Portland

Fore street
#58

Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad Museum 

Grand Trunk Station Tower Clock

Clockmaker: Edward Howard & Co.
Installed: early 1900s, removed 1966
Owner: George Collard
Status: Not Running; in museum display
Comments: Photographs taken right after grand trunk stations construction in 1903 show round windows in the tower. A few years later, clock faces appear. After the demolition of the station in 1966, the clockwork sat for a few years in a Western Promenade home and was then sold to a Connecticut antiques dealer. George Collard, a Portland antiques dealer specializing in watches and clocks, came across it at an Orlando antiques show. He brought it back to Portland and is loaning it to the Maine Narrow Gauge Museum. Collards dream is for the museum to build a tower and get the clock running once more. The museum has more pressing priorities, however, so such a project is not likely to happen any time soon. The clocks maker, Edward Howard and Co of Boston, enjoyed a prestigious world wide reputation for its clocks and watches.
 
Source: Landmarks Observer, Greater Portland Landmarks Inc, Winter 2005, Volume 30, No.4

portlandlandmarks.org


Portland

 Forest Avenue (woodfords corner)
#651

International Orders of Odd Fellows Hall

Clockmaker: Seth Thomas Clock Co.
Installed: 1910
Owner: Odd Fellows Hall Co of Deering
Status: Running
Comments: The clock has been electrified and its escapement parts removed. 
 
Source: Landmarks Observer, Greater Portland Landmarks Inc, Winter 2005, Volume 30, No.4

portlandlandmarks.org


Portland

Free Street (and Congress Street)

Hay Drug store clock

Clockmaker: Synchron
Installed: 1980s
Owner: Robert and Virginia Fitzgibbons
Status: Not Running
Comments: This electric clock has no historic value, but it is a significant public time piece by virtue of its placement in a beloved landmark on a prominent city square. There never was a mechanical timepiece here. The building was constructed in 1826; the first clock was installed when the third story, designed by John Calvin Stevens, was added in 1922. The building was restored by Greater Portland Landmarks in 1980.
 
Source: Landmarks Observer, Greater Portland Landmarks Inc, Winter 2005, Volume 30, No.4

portlandlandmarks.org


Portland

Monument square plaza

Monument square street clock

Recent events
http://www.pressherald.com/2012/08/24/raising-funds-for-clock_-its-about-time_2012-08-25/

Clockmaker: Electric Time
Installed: 1970s
Owner: City of Portland
Status: Running
Comments: A replica, this electric clock is one of the last cast-iron pieces made by electric time. It pays homage to an Edward Howard two-dial post clock installed in about the same location in 1900.
 
Source: Landmarks Observer, Greater Portland Landmarks Inc, Winter 2005, Volume 30, No.4

portlandlandmarks.org